The great paperback giveaway, part 1

So, I have 12 boxes of paperback books in my back room, that I haven’t unpacked in the six years since the move. The primary reason here is that I’ve never built enough shelving to catch up to my hardcover books, and thus have never had shelving for the paperbacks. Well, OK, the primary reason is that I am World Class Lazy, but let’s not get into that.

After this much time I occasionally worry that some terrible thing might have happened to the books I haven’t unpacked. So I’ve recently decided to buy some plastic packing cases, and move the books from the cardboard UHaul 2-cubes they’ve been in for six year into the plastic cases. I’ll be less worried with the books in the plastic, and it will give me a chance to reorganize the back room, so I can get around to putting some shelves in there.

So last night I moved over 4 of the boxes. It was an interesting experience. I have a few paperbacks I had forgotten I owned, but many, many more that each brought back very powerful memories of where and when I got them or read them, etc.

I also found that there were a large number of paperbacks that I didn’t need to keep anymore, for one reason or another. In the vast majority of cases the reason was “I’ve added a hardcover/trade paper copy to my collection in the intervening years”, but sometimes it’s just “I don’t want this anymore”.

So, while I was repacking these four boxes I culled these books from the boxes, as I don’t need them in the collection anymore:

Redundant paperbacks

Most of those are in perfect condition, the ones I bought new, with 8 or 10 exceptions; the ones I didn’t buy new. I figure I’ll probably get two more sets this size that I can also get rid of when I get around to moving over the rest of the books.

So, the question is: what do I do with these?

I could just take them to a used shop and get money or credit, but I figure before I do that I should give my friends, and online acquaintances, a shot at them.

So here’s the deal: if you want any of the items on the list below, post a comment saying which item or items (note to George: don’t say “I’ll take them all”) and why you want them. If your why is more interesting than “hey, free book”, I send them to you. I’ll keep the lists updated as items are claimed. For people in North America, I’ll eat the cost of mailing them. If anyone further distant wants some, you can PayPal me the postage costs. I will email you at the address you use to comment to get your physical address if I don’t already have it. Post your requests, don’t email me–that way I won’t forget what you wanted and everyone can see what’s already gone.

Whatever doesn’t get claimed by the end of June will go to the local used book shop.

Here’s the list:

17 Responses to “The great paperback giveaway, part 1”

  1. George says:

    I’ll take them a….dammit. Actually, I’m currently out of shelf space in the library, so if two boxes of books show up again then I think my wife would have words with me (although I suppose I could counter with the number of canoes stacked in the garage).

    But I would like “Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep” (because I’ve never read the book), “The Element of Fire” (because I quite enjoy Wells), and “Foundation and Earth” (because I think that’s one of the one’s I’m missing from my Asimov collection because they’re out of print). Although, now I’m going to have to go home and make sure I don’t already have the Wells and Asimov books.

  2. Fred says:

    I don’t know…there’s a lot of books on the list that look interesting, but nothing I desperately want, or feel like I need to own. Unlike you, I think, I’m quite content to rely on my local library for a lot of the books I read, especially when I haven’t read anything by that author before. And I already have a fair number of un-read paperbacks lying around.

    But still, The Name of the Rose and Brokedown Palace look interesting…even if my reason for wanting them isn’t much more interesting than “hey, free book”…

  3. Fred says:

    I don’t know…there’s a lot of books on the list that look interesting, but nothing I desperately want, or feel like I need to own. Unlike you, I think, I’m quite content to rely on my local library for a lot of the books I read, especially when I haven’t read anything by that author before. And I already have a fair number of un-read paperbacks lying around.

    But still, The Name of the Rose and Brokedown Palace look interesting…even if my reason for wanting them isn’t much more interesting than “hey, free book”…

  4. Mr. McLaren says:

    Fred, I’ll send you those books even though you didn’t really exert yourself on a reason, if you agree to blog about what you thought of them whenever you do get around to reading them. Deal?

  5. Fred says:

    Deal. I really could not say when that will be — 2009, maybe? I’ve got a to-read list that just gets longer every day — but I’ll aim for sooner. I’ll send you the mailing address by e-mail. Thanks.

  6. LaShawn says:

    Found your site after following the pingback to my DeHaven review. Thanks for the link!

    If you don’t mind, I’d be happy to take the Orson Scott Card short story collections off your hands. It will help me polish and hone my own skills in writing short stories, I’m thinking. I even promise to do a review of them. Pretty, pretty please?

  7. Mr. McLaren says:

    Sure. I’ll email you for address info.

    I’m assuming you’re U.S.ian, but I guess I’ll find out.

  8. sharon says:

    I am interested in the Chronicles of the King’s Tramp, because I really want it to be about a woman of loose virtue who hangs out with kings. Even if that’s not what it really is about, I’d like to read it. Also The Black Company Books Of The North series, The Black Company Books Of The South series, and The Silver Spike, because they sound good and fun.

  9. sharon says:

    Oh! Also, Seventh Son, because I read it once a long time ago and bits of it lurk in my brain and I never could recall the name of the book or the author, and it’s hard to ask after a book saying “You know, the one with the creepy old lady and the birth caul thing.”

  10. Mr. McLaren says:

    You got it. The last address I have for you is from the 2005 MLF DC, so I’ll email you to make sure it’s still current.

  11. Mr. McLaren says:

    Oh, and my friend Matt, who apparently doesn’t know how to use the comments is taking the Ford’s and the first two Connelly Bosch books. The remaining ones are quite readable without reading the first two.

  12. [...] rules as last time (and some of those are still available for another week as well). Whatever is not claimed by [...]

  13. Kira says:

    Sigh. Guess I have to ask for the Rucker as well. Two disparate people have been pushing me to read him for a while.

  14. Mr. McLaren says:

    My friend EBOC, who doesn’t know how to read, has claimed the Brust Taltos books. One wonders what he plans to do with them…

  15. Kim Wong says:

    Hi Chris,

    I’d like to take you on your offer on:
    1. Steven Brust’s “To Reign In Hell”
    -Reason: I love stories about Lucifer’s fall, and your review really sold me that this was one of the better ones out there. It’ll certainly be better than Anne Rice’s “Memnoch the Devil.”

    2. “Isle of the Dead,” by Roger Zelany
    -Reason: I hunted down “Lords of Light” for ages before I found a copy, and I was afraid to continue reading Zelany for fear that his other works might disappoint. If you’re recommending “Isle of the Dead,” I’d like to sample it.

    3. The John Carter books by Edgar Rice Burroughs
    -Reason: I read Howard Chaykin and Mike Mignola’s “Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser” last night, and Chaykin mentions in the introduction that the John Carter books are the ancestors of high adventure. And I love fantasies about Mars, and since I’ve never read a ERB book, this might be the best place to start.

    4. Bruce Sterling’s “Distraction.”
    -Reason: Again, I’ve never sampled Bruce Sterling’s work, and I’d like to take your recommendation on it.

    5. The Lawrence Block short stories collections
    -Reason: I’ve read Spillane and Marlowe, but I’ve shied away from trying the new noir like Block and Leonard. I find that noir stories fit best as short stories, so I’m interested in the Block short stories.

  16. Mr. McLaren says:

    You can have all of those except the Zelazny, which has already gone to someone else.

    You are snatching the Carter books out from under someone who emailed me instead of posting here!

    PM me a mailing address over on the VHive (if it ever works for more than a minute).

  17. aBookworm says:

    This is a great giveaway! I’ll take the Plum books! Zany as they are, they’re just right for light beach reading! Fun in the sun, ya know. If they’re gone, then Books 3-5 in the Harry Bosch mysteries by Michael Connelly, please. Comedy first, but a murder mystery is a murder mystery, especially one written by Connelly!

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